AlertMedia

AlertMedia Overview
Employees: 300
Headquarters: Austin, TX
Founded: 2013
About
AlertMedia enables your organization to streamline notifications and benefit from monitoring services that help improve your people’s safety.
Insights from the AlertMedia Product Marketing Team
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaJuly 7
Competitive positioning is a key component of defining core messaging. If we sit down and come up with copy on how to best describe our offerings, a key step is to compare that against how competitors describe themselves. You’ll likely be hit with an unpleasant surprise that about half your copy has already been used directly or indirectly by competitors. Some words might be well-adapted lexicons that prospects associate competitors with. Developing your positioning and messaging without this key insight would lead to bad outcomes. I always try to find words we can “own” in the prospect’...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaJuly 7
Staying in touch with customers/propsects directly is not an option for product marketers, IMO. There are passive ways to do it by being a listener - listen to sales/CS calls, attend talks by your audience on relevant topics, follow notable people on linkedin and read the content they are posting or engaging with. In my experience the best insights come from the most unexpected conversations involving customers and prospects. So my team always invests in time engaging with our audience every chance we get. That said, we definitely plan conversations for specific campaigns like early acce...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaJuly 7
I am assuming this is sales, account management, or customer success teams. It is an understandable concern - especially in large enterprise situations. There seems to be too much at stake to risk with someone you aren't familiar with. It can also be a factor of company culture - which is unfortunate when that creates a blocker for information flow. The first step is to build a relationship with those stakeholders. Let them trust your judgment and align with your motives - which, in the end, should benefit them as well. I'd pair that with executive support—get buy-in that the benefit fro...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaJuly 7
Keep it simple and practical. We use a simple battle card format to pull together the most essential details you need at your fingertips to enable competitive conversations. We host it on Seismic so it is easy to search for keywords and find the battle cards. We also do specific training sessions for tier 1 and tier 2 competitors (described above). I’ve also used slack channels to create a conversation around competition and tackle fringe situations effectively with group input. Again, those people on the frontlines are often the best source of insights.
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaJuly 7
There are a few types of competitors to think about: Tier 1: Prime Competition - Those who compete for the same dollars for a very similar product. You often end up in feature battles with them and eat each other’s lunch. They look very similar to your offering in the eyes of prospects. They end up copying your features or vice versa. Tier 2: Patrial overlap - They have one or more similar products, common verticals, or solve the same problem in different ways. They are sometimes point solutions if you have a more comprehensive offering, or maybe your product is the point solution - w...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaJuly 7
I dont think we should ever mention competitors directly in our messaging. Sure, you can address it directly in response if a prospect brings them up. But proactively naming competitors puts you in a defensive position and gives them undue attention. This usually doesn't work to our advantage. You could position it more generally like: Unlike (category descriptor) platforms, (our product) helps you solve for x. There are a handful of good frameworks out there. But I found that none of them perfectly fit your need for a particular company and product portfolio. So I build my own custom o...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaJuly 7
There are many ways to stay on top of competitive intel. If you have the budget and a clear use case, use a tool like Klue to help gather intel, and disperse it in your existing channels. Other ways I always used are the following: * Use your frontline teams - open up communication channels with your sales and customer success teams. They can gather invaluable information every single day from direct conversations. * Use gong - we live in unprecedented times of access to data and insights. Set alerts on gong for competitor names or lexicons indicating competitors. Have someon...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaMarch 22
Don’t overcomplicate it. Just find the fastest way to talk to customers. You could set up a formal feedback session with surveys, incentives, and all the jazz - which still gives you biased feedback. Or... you can just hop on an already scheduled customer call TODAY and casually ask customers for their quick qualitative feedback. Here is a sample message to your customer success folks: Hey {CSM name] - I am just trying to get a quick and casual reaction from our customers on this new messaging I’m putting together for an upcoming launch. Do you have any calls with customers this week wh...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaMarch 22
Trying to get buy-in over a theoretical outcome is always an uphill battle. I would focus on making meaningful progress by yourself on category design. Ask for forgiveness, not permission. Test things out and gain some traction. And then worry about getting buy-in to do more of what works. It will also be important to educate your team on why category creation (or redefinition) is the right strategy for your company at this time. Get them to read the book “Play Bigger” by Christopher Lochhead. Follow Christoper Lochhead on LinkedIn for bite-sized insights on the topic. Show them examples...
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing, AlertMediaMarch 22
Short answer - yes. It depends on what you mean by “writing”. The skillset of a best-selling novel writer vs. an effective product marketer is different. Written copy is by far the most powerful way to engage our audience and drive results. In my experience, you can’t get really good at product messaging without being creative with words. And you can’t be really good at that without reading a lot. So my advice - read a lot and practice writing for the intended medium.
AlertMedia Product Marketing Leaders
Harsha Kalapala
Harsha Kalapala
Vice President, Product Marketing