content marketing measurement

Free ebook: The Ultimate Content Strategist Playbook No. 5: Measuring and Optimizing Your Content Marketing

The premise is simple. If you want to continuously improve the quality of your content and grow your audience, you need a secret weapon that tells you what content to create, how to effectively distribute it, how to measure the success of each piece, and then how to use those conclusions to fuel your next round of publishing. We’re here to give you that secret weapon. In this playbook, we’ll cover exactly what metrics you need to use, then explain how to use those metrics so you’re continuously employing them to create better content and engage your audience in the most effective way possible.

Table Of Contents

Pg 3 - I. Introduction Pg 7 - II. What to Measure Pg 21 - III. Optimizing the Creation Process Pg 28 - IV. Optimizing the Engagement Process Pg 34 - Conclusion Pg 36 - Appendix

First 3 Pages

ULTIMATE CONTENT STRATEGIST PLAYBOOK CONTENTLY The Ultimate Content Strategist Playbook No. 5: Measuring and Optimizing Your Content Marketing Copyright © 2015 Contently. All rights reserved. contently.com By Joe Lazauskas ULTIMATE CONTENT STRATEGIST PLAYBOOK CONTENTLY Table of Contents I. Introduction 3 II. What to Measure 7 III. Optimizing the Creation Process 21 IV. Optimizing the Engagement Process 28 V. Conclusion 34 VI. Appendix 36 I read about two things obsessively: basketball and content marketing. So when I explain how metrics should be used in content marketing, I often wind up talking about the Miami Heat and their smart, data-crazy young coach, Erik Spoelstra. There’s a good chance you already know about LeBron James. But Spoelstra was the one who dictated the strategy for James and his teammates to succeed. With-out him, the Heat may never have won anything.Long story short, everyone expected the Heat to dominate from the get-go when James joined the team in 2010, forming a superstar trio with Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosh. But they struggled to play cohesively, and it took time for their coaches and players to evaluate what strategy worked best for their personnel. Eventually they won two championships and made four straight trips to the NBA Finals, but the team wasn’t a dynasty from day one. They had great players from the start, but they needed to learn how to optimize. Coach Spoelstra was the one who got them thinking about data the right way. He didn’t panic when the team struggled in their first season together and sportswriters openly wondered if the team was doomed. He didn’t pressure team president Pat Riley into making a hasty trade and ship off one of his stars. Instead, the young coach, an infamous data cruncher, turned to advanced stats to understand what went wrong—and what the Heat could do to get over the hump. To the casual observer, the Heat didn’t appear to be a drastically different team between their first and second year, but those who studied the intricacies of the game saw just how important Spoelstra’s adjustments were. He got the team to play an aggressive, unorthodox style of defense that complemented their athletic yet undersized roster. On offense, he turned one-on-one gridlock into a system of spacing and efficient corner shooting.