Free ebook: Email Marketing Field Guide

What’s inside: A comprehensive field guide to email marketing. Topics include: Creating an email marketing plan How HTML email works Designing and coding Avoiding spam filters Testing your email designs Measuring performance You don’t have to be a professional web designer to create and send HTML email. In this guide, we’ll explain the basics of HTML email and run through the tips and best practices you’ll need to consider as you develop your own email marketing plan. Excerpt Before you start designing, writing, and sending campaigns, you should define your audience. Once you get a grasp on the people who will be reading your emails, it will be much easier to decide what to say to them.

First 3 Pages

Email marketing field guide Hello. "What is email marketing?" Fair question. Unlike one-to-one messages, email marketing entails sending one message to many people—dozens, hundreds, or even thousands of people. It's permission-based, which means your readers must opt in to your newsletter, and you need to explain to them why they're receiving it. Because personal email services like Gmail or Yahoo! limit the amount of people you can send to at one time, an email service provider like MailChimp is the best way to send email marketing. ESPs will manage your delivery infrastructure, help keep your messages out of spam filters, and generally do a lot of not-fun-but-necessary work for you. People use MailChimp to send all sorts of fantastic email newsletters to their customers, fans, friends, and followers, and we hope this guide will help you do the same. Create an Email Marketing Plan An "email marketing plan" might sound complicated, intimidating, and time-consuming to put together, but it's not as hard as you might think. In this section,we'll walk you through the most important steps, highlight real-life case studies,and give you everything you need to know to get started. Define your audience Before you start designing, writing, and sending campaigns, you should define your audience. Once you get a grasp on the people who will be reading your emails, it will be much easier to decide what to say to them. If you already have subscribers on your list, their signup method can be used to help identify them. For example, if they subscribed during the checkout process through your online store, they're customers. A collection of subscribers that found you through your website or at a public event (like fairs, trade shows, etc.), would be classified as more of a general audience. If you don't have subscribers yet, think about who is your target audience. How will you find these people, and what do you envision they'll want to read in your emails? Perhaps you're an author or a blogger. In that case, your subscribers are going to be interested in your written content. If you're a retailer, subscribers will want to know about your new products or how they can better use what they've already purchased from you. If you're somewhere in between, your audience is likely made up of enthusiasts of your work or your brand. Case Study: Rooftop Comedy lands somewhere in that third category. The San Francisco-based company sells comedy albums, produces festivals, and records stand-up acts all over the United States. With their "Clip of the Week" emails,