All related (6)
D Matthew Landry
VP Product Management, Networking and Security, CiscoFebruary 22
 Entry-level product managers for an enterprise product line tend to come in from two paths: technical background, and business background. Those with a stronger technical background might come from another part of the business, such as technical marketing or solution/sales engineering. They make up for a relative lack of experience in product strategy with deeper knowledge of product specifics (or demonstrated ability to learn), understanding of the industry & market (or demonstrated ability ...), and hours on the clock sitting with customers to listen and problem solve. Entry level PMs ...
Veronica Hudson
Director of Product Management, ActiveCampaign
I think of product management skill sets in three major buckets: technical, business, and customer understanding. When I talk to aspiring product managers, I like to gauge the maturity of their skills sets in each of these buckets. Ideally a candidate would be strong in one bucket, have some basic understanding in another, and be actively working to hone a third (although I wouldn't expect any sort of proficiency). A good example of this would be a CSM. They likely have a very strong understanding of customer wants/needs, a good grasp on the business overall, but may be lacking in their tec...
D Matthew Landry
VP Product Management, Networking and Security, Cisco
Honestly, the first product manager for a company is probably not ready to establish a prioritization framework. The first PM probably needs to focus on customer discovery, market discovery, MVP intuition, and experimentation. Until you have established product-market fit with enthusiastic customer demand, rigorous prioritization is probably bikeshedding. Once you have that fit, that's when you'll start to get inbound requests/ideas/complaints from current customers, potential customers, new market segments you hadn't considered, and sales teams eager to displace competition. Then you can ...
Rena Mashintchian
Director of Product Management, Box
In my mind, we are always selling to a customer.  It starts with the initial sale, when we move an organization from a prospect to a customer.  Once they become a customer, our goal is to ensure they continue to renew their contract with us.  And not only do we want them to renew, but we also want to upsell them to additional products and services.  Throughout the various stages, PMs should be there to support account teams as needed, especially around handling customer objections.  It’s very beneficial to establish strong relationships with the sales team and strategize with them on how...
Alexa Maturana-Lowe
Director of Product Management, Core Experience, Fivetran
Every company is different but I can tell you what I've been working on as a part of my transition: * Impact - as a part of my transition, as an individual contributor I chose to take on high profile company wide initiatives that helped me to show that I could make a huge impact for Fivetran as a business in addition to evolving the product experience and functionality. This forced me to understand what matters to the business more and how product changes impact business outcomes and helped me to get a seat at the table for company wide strategic changes. * Communication -...
Luca Beltrami
Head of Product, Retailers, Faire
Let me start from the commonalities: You are building something that solves a user problem and creates customer value that also generates business value in the process. The line between enterprise and SMB is fluid, though in the case of companies like Faire (and I also observed this at Airbnb and Travelnuts to some degree), SMBs often act more like consumers. Two key differences are: * Where you get your insights: The research process tends to be more consumer-esque for SMBs, where you rely on user research and experimentation more than on sales teams or account management tea...