All related (15)
Sina Falaki
Director, Industry and Product Marketing, MotiveJune 22
Focus on exactly what you're trying to achieve on the end goal for the market research. Often times inadequate questions in the survey results into poor results. Often times I see these following problems during the market research phase: 1. Inaccurate data and results - because you don't know what you're looking for, the results are often not fantastic. Not keying in on the right questions initially to test the hypothesis leads to results that are then bland and general. In order to remedy this, make sure you take the question side seriously. If you're looking to gather data or ROI, key...
Tracy Montour
Head of Product Marketing, HiredScoreJuly 29
Research is one of the most critical components of strong positioning and messaging. The most common mistake I see is that organizations approach research with a forgone conclusion. Research should be exploratory. It's something we can learn from. Organizations who conduct research purely to reinforce their beliefs are yelling into an echo chamber. 
Mary (Shirley) Sheehan
Group Manager, Engagement & Retention Campaigns, Adobe
I answered this in a similar post - see it here: https://sharebird.com/can-you-outline-the-best-structure-and-format-for-user-personas-that-are-useful-across-the-org
Katie Levinson
Head of Product Marketing, Handshake
Sure do! I like to start with some qualitative research first to help get at any nuances in messaging, especially across different audience segments. Then, run a survey (max diff is a great technique) to understand what resonates most with your different segments. If you also have the budget and/or time, running your messaging by focus groups is another good option, so you can get a deeper understanding of their reactions and sentiment.
Agustina Sacerdote
Global Head of PMM and Content Marketing, TIDAL, Square
I would start with getting information from Sales first. At Square, I rely very strongly on Account Managers to get a sense for the needs and attitudes of larger merchants. I'll talk to them directly first and then will try to partner up with them on specific conversations to close very specific knowledge gaps. Try to coordinate with your Sales / AM counterparts to make the 30 - 45 minute call with customers productive for everyone. 
Sonia Moaiery
Product Marketing, Intercom | Formerly Glassdoor, Prophet, Kraft
I always start with positioning ideas as hypotheses (a fancy term for your hunches). This approach is helpful to show stakeholders that you’re open to their input/feedback, and potentially being wrong. When you have hypotheses, you come to the conversation saying “here’s something I have a hunch about, but I don’t have enough data yet to tell me this is a good idea or the right thing, I’d love to hear your thoughts or help me poke holes in this” I think about building consensus in three stages to bring stakeholders along the journey with you so none of your ideas feel like a surprise by th...
John Hurley
Vice President Product Marketing, Amplitude
What I love about product design teams is how differently they think and create. They tend to be really amazing at information design. PMM can create strong foundations – let's say user personas – and UX researchers and designers might totally reimagine how to display personas relative to their own projects. That can open up a new world of thinking for PMM – and more practically become an asset used by PMM for a variety of work (onboarding new hires, design new creative takes on messaging, channels and campaigns).  Those nuanced new panes of perspective can help PMM explore new ideas, ke...
Daniel Palay
Head Of Product Marketing, 3Gtms
The problem is that there still aren't too many good entry-level PMM roles out there (assuming you're talking about coming out of undergrad). My best advice (as someone who didn't come to PMM until they were in their mid-30s) would be: Find a role that allows you to develop the skills PMMs ultimately need to bring. Don't worry too much about industry, just make sure it's one where you're curious enough about the products, customers and problems to keep you intellectually motivated. That will serve you well when making that jump to PMM.