All related (8)
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

It really depends on what type of business it is. For instance, a product feature or product should be so frictionless that it allows users to onboard (adopt) easily once they are in the experience. Product marketing is responsible for bringing users to that experience. So it is almost eyeballs vs. activation. In reality these metrics should be shared, and over time broken up where the tech is meant to solve for the customer's need.

Nico Rattazzi
VP of Product at Zumper
It's worth ensuring you collaborate closely with your PMM to ensure you know who is responsible for what along all touchpoints. In general, top of the funnel channels owned by marketing should be owned by their team (social, paid, blog, email, etc). Everything else should be owned by the product/design/engineering team (with the exception when marketing owns the development of those product ie. lead gen with "no code" tools). The touchpoints where marketing hands customers over to the product experience should have the right metrics tracked to understand A) the quantity and quality of users...more
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

Such a great question! When you first set a KPI especially if you are in a new market and/or in a new product/customer space, it can feel uneasy. The best way I have learned is by setting something and tracking it over time, seeing if there is any measurable change. If not start by marking out the customer's journey (no matter who they are) and see if you can collect data on their interactions along the way. This may reveal some hidden trends you weren't yet measuring.

Farheen Noorie
Director of Product Management, Growth and Monetization at Zendesk
I'd suggest dont split the KPIs. Here is why Product Management and Product Marketing are two different ways to accomplish the same outcomes. The difference is one is in product and the other is outside of product but both the experiences are touching the same customer and driving the same north star outcomes.  But in some cases that may not be possible either because of the org structure or just how your company functions. If that is the case I would suggest to map out both the in product and out of product journeys on a unified customer timeline and then go through identifying KPIs,...more
Tasha Alfano
Staff Product Manager, Libraries and SDKs at Twilio
The partnership with Product Marketing is one of the most important functions when it comes to rolling out a successful product. Don’t read too much into the last part of that statement though, a Product Marketing Manager (PMM) is a crucial teammate to include from the start, not just at launch time. If I know who I will be working with in advance, I tag them in Product Requirements Documents or other important materials. Sharing context from the beginning is so important!  As far as the KPIs go, we are really talking about how you measure the success of a product, and Product Management a...more
Nico Rattazzi
VP of Product at Zumper

KPIs around delight unless this is your key product differentiator (which is proven to be compelling to customers). Focus on building an intuitive and effective product experience that users would want to recommend to their friends/colleagues. Focusing on the final pieces of polish such as interactions, delight, animations, etc are fluff until you're really providing value to your customers. This is why keeping your KPI or success metrics concise and essential will allow you to provide the most impact to customers.

Farheen Noorie
Director of Product Management, Growth and Monetization at Zendesk
Product Management is a bit hard to list skills for because product managers wear so many different hats and each company has a different way on how they think of product management. But I do think there are some broad skills that PMs should have or build as they think of their career.  1. Hustle - This is the number 1 skill that I look for. If you have this everything else follows or can be built. 2. Empathy - Understanding your customer and being able to put yourselves in their shoes 3. Storytelling - Communication is key for product managers but I think its super importan...more
Paresh Vakhariya
Director of Product Management at Atlassian
Here is a rough process I would follow but it really varies a lot depending upon each business: * Understand Company Objectives and Goals * Have a clear Product Vision and Strategy that aligns with these goals/objectives * Create higher level OKR's that can map to KPI's * Determine the top KPI's the company is interested in driving/moving. Examples are: Business Performance KPIs: Customer counts, Customer / user acquisition, Retention Rate, Churn Rate, Revenue etc. * Make a prioritized list of these KPI's you can measure. Example Revenue would map to MRR and so on * Pick ...more