Justine Davis

Justine DavisShare

VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, Atlassian
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Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 17

You have to message and target both, with different messages/tactics. 

Example:

Let’s say the platform team evaluate the product themselves. If the developers don’t see enough value in the product then they won’t use it, and the product will fail. My guidance is to understand the end user (developer) and the buyer needs and arm them with both. Target the developer as your champion if they are the end user by making a product that solves their use cases, and stay out of the way. Don't bombard them with sales, gradually let them find product value and then enable them with content for the buyer to convince the sale.

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 17

1. Be literal instead of aspirational

2. Speak tot heir pain points and really understand what those pain points are

3. Say more with less - whitepapers and really long form blogs that are not helpful will not work. Leverage the community aspect as much as possible here and use code snippets, real life get your hands dirty demos

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 17

Rather than name the best product demos, I think I will tell you what makes a good product demo. (for what it is worth, Atlassian's demo den series on Youtube from product managers is an exampel of a fantastic product demo series). Your ultimate goal is to educate, inspire, and convince the view to act in a product demo.

  1. Show, don't tell. Rule number 1 in a product demo is showing the product
  2. Nail the messaging - be very clear about what the product does, how it will solve pain points, and who it is for
  3. Do not make it too long - it will become a snooze fest
  4. We are in product marketing so tell a story! Analogies are so powerful. Use humor, pull at the heart strings, make your customers feel the pain.
  5. Showcase solutions over features - ie don't show me the calendar feature on the iphone. Show me how that calendar feature will solve the chaos of being a VP of marketing, and a mom by telling me a story about my absolutely insane schedule and how the calendar is the cure.
  6. Provide social proof - "oh I can see myself in these customers!"
  7. Don't create just 1. Sometimes you need to speak to differfent personas about their problems. 
  8. consider live chat if it is a product demo vs a 1 minute product explainer ad
Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 16

In product is good, but only if it is helpful. Do not make your product times square. Release. notes, blogs, social leading to blogs, whats new section in product, office hours, newsletters, etc. work well. Just give them the option to self serve the information they need and stay out of their way for a solid product led growth funnel for developers. 

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 16

There is not really a difference if you are working at a product led growth company. You should drop developer sign ups the same way you would track any marketing funnel:

  • Site visits
  • Evaluations
  • first day usage
  • second week usage
  • monthly active usage
  • feature usage
  • upsell
  • customers
  • revenue

The real difference is the channels you use to market to them. See some of my answers from channel questions in the AMA for where to go for those!

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 16

I don't :) Not my job to hire developers. It is my job to evaluate the role of product marketing and developer advocates, however. I don't typically look at the cost of hiring them, but I do look at the typical business metrics and marketing funnel metrics to ensure we are ROI positive. I partner with a buyer experience team who has developers, designers, product managers that are dedicated to my team to help with our marketing web activity. 

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 16

The best products are built with the market in mind–and product marketing should contribute long before anything gets put on a shelf. It is an expectation that product marketing is involved way before the feature gets built and can answer "can I sell this?" with product. It definitely helps to have joint goals with product so work is not at odds. Product and product marketing are a true partnership and PMMs/PMs who realize this and don't treat the relationship as transactional are far better for it. 

Product marketing lives in 3 worlds — customers, product, and marketing (of course). And we bring the 3 together. It rests on product marketing to shape a clear, compelling, consistent voice for the product in the market. 

My marketing counterparts (analyst relations, demand gen, PR, performance marketing, brand, analytics, etc.) are in my team slack channels, attend my team meetings, and we have regular sparring sessions. I treat them as if they are on my team, because they are! Shared goals help here too. 

To work with CSM and sales, I have monthly business reviews where we do go to market deep dives and swap intel. We have regular win/loss reports, I get pulled in to do customer calls, we make enablement with a feedback loop from sales and CSM on what is needed. 

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 16

There is not really a difference if you are working at a product led growth company. You should drop developer sign ups the same way you would track any marketing funnel:

  • Site visits
  • Evaluations
  • first day usage
  • second week usage
  • monthly active usage
  • feature usage
  • upsell
  • customers
  • revenue

The real difference is the channels you use to market to them. See some of my answers from channel questions in the AMA for where to go for those!

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 15

I would say long form content messaging needs to be very technical towards developers and that is where developer evangelists are powerful at building brand trust and community. Short form messaging is the same as any other messaging: needs to understand the target audience and speak to their pain points, then give them the "so what" that your product can help them with. 

Justine Davis
Justine Davis
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions, AtlassianNovember 15

DevRel and Dev Marketers are 2 sides of the same coin. Developer relations (or tech evangelists) are responsible for the truly technical content with the ultimate goal of building a developer community to market the product. Developer marketers partner with DevRel to distribute their content and drive funnel marketing goals. Examples:

DevRel:

  • is go to for message testing and technical BS-ometer
  • Distill technical differentiation into positioning statements, messaging, and value propositions that will be leveraged throughout sales and marketing
  • Work with product management to distill key functionality and benefits into core product marketing messages, and create technical narratives that differentiate with technical users
  • writes the long form SEO content, technical demos, technical talks
  • create/execute a content strategy that encompasses strategic partner’s external sites as well as ours (video, technical documentation, use cases)
  • co-develop marketing plan with strategic partner - what channels are we missing? what are cool use cases? What placements or integrations should we ask for in product?
  • Assist in building partner pitches (with technical knowledge), Plan, produce, and maintain technical competitive intelligence and sales enablement tools and training.
  • Provide competitive intelligence and enablement to the field
  • Speaks at conferences and/or user groups - more technical use cases and thought leadership
  • identifies speaking opportunities we should be in that scale
  • Monitors & responds to Atlassian Community, HN, Reddit forums
  • Channels customer usability feedback from the external community back to the internal teams to improve our products
  • Be the translation layer between product and product marketing for technical concepts.
  • Authors design/user guides, technical blog posts, how-to tutorials, builds demos and delivers high-quality training material, webinars, presentations, data sheets, technical white papers, web content, and reference architectures.
  • Creates sandboxes and knows products deeply in order to inform technical content

Developer Marketing:

  • writes the messaging
  • distributes the content
  • drives strategic partnerships: report on performance, decide on GTM iniatives
  • Creates sales enablement (CIO/CTO/VP decks), battle cards
  • creator of customer stories
  • creator of landinag pages
  • writes feature launch blogs
  • driver of press/ analyst relations / conference stories
  • demand gen
  • PMM counterpart to a product squad
  • PR/AR audience launch blog = pmm writes and technical pmm reviews.
  • message house to inform landing page, activation emails
  • Branding
  • Executes on on-boarding strategy
  • Onboarding: Develop, test, and implement onboarding programs to activate new users (activation emails)
  • funnel optimization
  • Pricing and packaging - Ability to use pricing as a strategic lever, ability to build the biz case and ability to sell the organization on the vision.
  • Be the expert on all technical buyer personas, understanding their buying agendas and how they evaluate and buy.
  • Speaks at conferences and/or user groups - product value presentations
  • competitor analysis
Credentials & Highlights
VP / Head of Product Marketing, Agile and DevOps solutions at Atlassian
Product Marketing AMA Contributor
Top 10 Product Marketing Contributor
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