All related (8)
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

Such a great question! When you first set a KPI especially if you are in a new market and/or in a new product/customer space, it can feel uneasy. The best way I have learned is by setting something and tracking it over time, seeing if there is any measurable change. If not start by marking out the customer's journey (no matter who they are) and see if you can collect data on their interactions along the way. This may reveal some hidden trends you weren't yet measuring.

Nico Rattazzi
VP of Product at Zumper
I would start by understanding what is the company being graded on by its investors and how is this new product going to deliver/contribute to that KPI. Let's say your investors are keen on seeing revenue growth this year. You can begin by benchmarking the lifetime revenue growth of the various product offerings of your company and then estimate (based on your user research/data) what will be the adoption rate for this new product area/market. You can then begin to model out some first year numbers. Of course, this will seem super arbitrary but truth be told once you launch, your prediction...more
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

Interestingly enough I see two trends in the types of KPIs product teams miss. 

1) Aligning with the larger's organization or business goals - Ensuring that your product roadmap is actually impacting the success metrics (OKRs, KPIs) of the business itself is critical to knowing if you are investing in and prioritizing the right work.

2) Capturing "technical or engineering" metrics - Any work that your team spends time on should be impacting some metric. Even metrics that are technical (the most common one being latency) should be captured, reported on, and measured over time. 

Farheen Noorie
Director of Product Management, Growth and Monetization at Zendesk
+1 to arbitrary! I think setting goals for both new and existing markets may feel like excel magic, some numbers that are based on mainly assumptions and the product manager's gut. Its uncomfortable and may feel unscientific but I think all forward planning is like that.  I would address some uncertainity in the following way 1. Make sure I am tracking the right metrics, New markets could mean new metrics, the business is starting from scratch and may be different from the metrics that a mature market may have. Example in a mature market I would focus on expansions vs in a ...more
Tasha Alfano
Staff Product Manager, Libraries and SDKs at Twilio
I’ve worked with developer focused tooling for almost 7 years so I know exactly what you mean here. On almost every new feature or product our teams put into motion, we have a huge list of factors to consider such as security, legal, or billing. For developer tooling, there’s usually no change to pricing or billing, no new SKU. Does that mean these types of products don't provide value? No way! Libraries, SDKs, APIs, CLIs, and other developer focused tools are a huge part of the overall product. They can open your product up in a way to create value you never imagined. When it comes to mak...more
Nico Rattazzi
VP of Product at Zumper
My CS degree itself was not that important but my CS background and experience as a software engineer was critical to my success. Learning to code, understanding web frameworks, knowing the process for software development, and making tradeoffs between complexity and impact really help provide effective solutions for the organization. Granted, you can have an incredible tech lead but that won't always be the case. I believe that if you're working on a digital product, it helps to have some technical understanding to ensure you're working with the development team responsibly. Also, really h...more
Farheen Noorie
Director of Product Management, Growth and Monetization at Zendesk
Product Management is a bit hard to list skills for because product managers wear so many different hats and each company has a different way on how they think of product management. But I do think there are some broad skills that PMs should have or build as they think of their career.  1. Hustle - This is the number 1 skill that I look for. If you have this everything else follows or can be built. 2. Empathy - Understanding your customer and being able to put yourselves in their shoes 3. Storytelling - Communication is key for product managers but I think its super importan...more
Paresh Vakhariya
Director of Product Management at Atlassian
Here is a rough process I would follow but it really varies a lot depending upon each business: * Understand Company Objectives and Goals * Have a clear Product Vision and Strategy that aligns with these goals/objectives * Create higher level OKR's that can map to KPI's * Determine the top KPI's the company is interested in driving/moving. Examples are: Business Performance KPIs: Customer counts, Customer / user acquisition, Retention Rate, Churn Rate, Revenue etc. * Make a prioritized list of these KPI's you can measure. Example Revenue would map to MRR and so on * Pick ...more