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Have you ever considered using a stakeholder empathy map? How much time and resources went into it? And how often do you think a product marketing team needs to refresh it? Thanks

3 Answers
Harish Peri
Harish Peri
Okta SVP Product Marketing β€’ December 14

Its always good practice to have a stakeholder map. The goal of this document (which I prefer to keep at at individual level) is to remind yourself of who should be included in decisions such as launches, campaigns, sales motions, pricing, web changes etc. Information you need in this could be:

  • Name, title, relationship
  • What should they expect from you
  • What should you expect from them
  • RACI for their involvement in key processes. E.g. R for pricing, or I for launches, etc

Create one of these within your first 30 days of starting a job or taking on a new role, and update every 6 months. It will take some time in the beginning, but its completely worth it.

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Mary Sheehan
Mary Sheehan
Adobe Head of Lightroom Product Marketing β€’ February 22

Absolutely! While I haven't used a formal empathy map, I rely heavily on DACI charts (Driver, Accountable, Consulted, Informed) for every project. It's like an empathy map focused on action. I map stakeholders, their goals, preferred communication channels, and roles (decision-maker, influencer, etc.). Every product or launch demands a refresh to capture evolving dynamics.

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Jason Perocho
Jason Perocho
Amperity SVP, Head of Marketing β€’ December 22

I have never considered making an empathy map. Empathy mapping is a time-consuming task that often doesn't produce actionable insights. Empathy maps are also limited in scope and only help visualize a specific problem.

Instead, I recommend focusing on how you show up at work. This is a repost from another question, but thought it was still relevant here:

  1. Be Empathetic - Everyone has their challenges inside the office and at home. Successful people take the time to understand what's driving their colleagues and show genuine compassion and kindness, even when their colleagues are not at their best. People are drawn to those who try to understand or manage the whole person.

  2. Be Authentic - Your most significant asset is the trust your colleagues put in you. Authenticity is built by continually showing as the same person, following up on your promises, and always telling the truth no matter how hard the news or opinion may be.

  3. Proactively Listen - We want to be heard in every facet of our lives. Proactively listening and responding to the presented information builds connections by showing you care about what your colleague is saying.

  4. Assume Positive Intent - Address issues early and assume your colleague was trying their best with the information they have.

  5. Stay neutral and don't gossip - It's easy to spiral when bad things happen in the office. Don't get caught up because 1) you may not know all the details 2) you may isolate someone and 3) whatever you say will come around. Besides, people like those who build people up instead of piling on and bringing people down.

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