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Mollie Bodensteiner

Mollie Bodensteiner

Revenue Operations Leader, Sound Agriculture

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Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 20
I believe the "typical" revenue operations career path varies based on the person. But I typically see team members breaking into Revenue Operations a few different ways: * Entry level: Coming into an organization at the start of their career in an analyst/system admin role and learning about the different roles in Revenue Operations and determining if want to generalize or specialize * Transitioning from Specialization: Moving from a speciality such a Marketing Operations into more of a generalized Revenue Operations strategic role where work cross functionally * Transitioning from Revenue Organization: Working as BDR, SDR, AE and enjoying the operationalize side of the business and making a transition into RevOps Generally, I think you are starting as a specialist (either in a function: sales, marketing, customer success) or by domain (systems, analytics, etc.) and working to build understanding of other functions and specialities through cross-functional alignment and coordination and moving from execution to strategic delivery.
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3137 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 20
When I go into an organization and establish a Revenue Operations practice for the first time, my typical 30, 60, 90 is as follows: * 30: Review Landscape, Define the Foundation * Define and align on what Revenue Operations means to the organization (ensure clear roles and responsibilities) * Identify the current state, gaps, and priorities (this includes existing processes, KPIs, tools/tech, resources, etc.) * Define how you will deliver (how should stakeholders work with revops, operating cadence, communication strategy) * Build plan for next 3 months (get alignment/buy-in on this) * 60: Build the Foundation * Focus on delivering the foundational items needed for the business: Lifecycle, Rules of Engagement, Standard Operating Procedures, etc. * This is critical, without having a stable foundation everything else will wobble * 90: Iterate and Operationalize * Identify the key deliverables and initiatives needed to move business forward through efficiency, performance improvements, etc. (this will be different for every business) I urge RevOps leaders to come in and ensure they have a strong framework across people, process, data, policy and technology before trying to immediately jump into “project” work as without this foundational framework building a strong operating cadence for prioritization, resource allocation and delivery becomes very challenging.
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2072 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 20
The best way to scale your revenue operations team is to really assess where your largest gaps are and invest in resources to close those gaps. * Do you have a strong systems team, but poor processes - hire for operations * Strong operations, but poor execution in systems - hire for systems * Determine if you want to hire specialists or generalists (know that finding really strong experienced generalist can be a challenge) This really comes down to mapping out your roadmap and the assessment of what you need to deliver and making the right investments accordingly. It is also important to understand where you can augment full-time resources through leveraging consulting to help deliver on critical projects were it makes sense.
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1778 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 20
The best way to think about a 30/60/90 day plan when you have never done one before is to break it out as follows: * Define what Revenue Operations is, what is the vision, responsibilities, etc. getting this alignment is critical when this is a new role/function in an organization * Outline the resources on the team (who does what) * Outline the current technology stack (cannot figure out what you all have, ask finance, someone pays the bill ;-)) * Determine how the business should work with RevOps (what is the operating cadence, how will work be prioritized, what is the communication plan, etc.) * Summarize the current state (where is the business today, what is missing/needed) * This turns into your roadmap - outline what resources and collaboration will be needed to properly deliver (set these expectations upfront) Here is a sample RevOps roadmap template: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1RrROWL8uZYXJtobQi0FnvRP8oI7ifV9VE1aAmZsxY5g/edit?usp=sharing
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1533 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 20
Regarding quick wins in the first 90 days, I think you need to be mindful of what you are trying to deliver. If you come in and start building and delivering to “stop the bleeding” of top priority issues without understanding the business you might end up creating more of a mess in the future (forest and trees). Instead focus on the first 90 days, really understanding the business, how it operates, what the goals are, what is working well, what is not, etc. and building a realistic plan for delivery in the first 30/60 days and starting to deliver on that plan. The foundational items are going to be key, ensuring have lifecycle, clear KPI definitions, data infrastructure, standard operating procedures, seller processes, etc. are always P1s. If you are eager for quick wins, look at key business as usual processes that occur on a repeat cadence and tend to be manual and look at how to operationalize those. Anywhere that administrative time can be decreased for items that are stable and repeatable opens up additional bandwidth and are good quick wins for scale.
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1312 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 20
When meeting with cross-functional teams during our first month at a company as a RevOps leader, here are a few of the key questions I would consider asking: * How do you currently work with Revenue Operations? * What do you feel is working, what is not working? * What is the biggest challenge you have with meeting your goals? Why? * What do you feel is working really well? Why? * What are your expectations for me in this role? What should my expectations be for you? * How do you currently work with other cross-functional leaders? Cadence, prioritization, communication, etc. * How do you currently work with your team? Cadence, prioritization, communication, etc. * What do you feel is our biggest opportunity as a company? Why? Note: I typically recommend asking the same questions to all functional leaders and then pulling together into a matrix so you can see where there are trends in responses. Also use these meetings to listen and absorb verse starting to solve. Too often we start to solve, but take these meetings as an opportunity to learn and digest, then work to build your plan after you have the information needed.
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1220 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 20
My framework for prioritizing is pretty simple, I like to use a quadrant style prioritization framework and allocate requests into the following format and ensure that I have X% of time allocated to each quadrant: * Top Left: Do Now * High importance, High urgency (generally like to keep around 50% of time allocated to this category) * Bottom Left: Delegate * Low importance, High urgency (generally like to keep around 10% of time allocated to this category) - these are typically the distractions that comes up and delay strategic initiatives - sometimes they just need done, but really focus on how you streamline, reduce and delegate these items * Top Right: Do Next * High importance, low urgency (generally like to keep around 40% of time to this category) * These are the items that if you do not schedule and focus on getting these done, they will become high urgency and typically turn into fire drills, so trying to get ahead of scheduling these into workload * Bottom Right: Delete * Low importance, low urgency (0% allocation) * If the request does not align with strategy, needs deprioritized (these are your say no, or not right now)
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1188 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 14
I think my biggest frustration is generally around "time in the day" and "goal post-shifting without proper foresight." With these challenges, you have to focus on what you have control over. Unfortunately, I have not been able to figure out how to add hours to the day, so instead, I have to drive clear prioritization and delegation (and sub-prioritization throughout the team) to make sure that we are focused on the right outputs at the right time to drive business value. This also requires the necessity of being able to properly set expectations with stakeholders as to why their request is being de-prioritized, etc. What I have found is that if you as a RevOps leader are organized around what you are focused on, delivery dates, and prioritization it becomes an easy conversation with stakeholders when you look at stack ranking against capacity - but if you are not able to properly communicate and articulate roadmap/prioritization it makes it harder to justify why. Businesses change - but ensuring that Revenue Operations is not at the tail end of the shift is critical. We talk a lot about Revenue Operations getting a seat at the table and it's important to remember that seats are earned and not given. However, having foresight into what business decisions might cause an impact before the decision is made allows Revenue Operations to properly work through requirements and timelines necessary to set expectations upfront with business leaders. This is where having clear roadmaps, prioritization, and timelines are very helpful. Instead of saying "This is going to be a lot of work" be able to articulate why it is a lot of work (remember who your audience is - if technical or not) and why the work is critical to the success of the project and by doing this what has to change due to the capacity of your team. I have yet to work on a team that is not operating at full capacity - so if something comes in - something has to come out (or more resources are needed).
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685 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 14
Here are my predictions for the future of Revenue Operations: * Integration of Sales, Marketing, and Customer Success: Revenue operations will involve breaking down silos between sales, marketing, and customer success departments. A unified approach will ensure seamless collaboration and consistent messaging throughout the customer lifecycle. * Advanced Analytics and Predictive Modeling: RevOps will leverage advanced analytics and predictive modeling to forecast revenue, identify trends, and optimize pricing strategies. AI-driven tools will help businesses make data-driven decisions to maximize profitability. * Customer-Centric Revenue Strategies: Businesses will focus on understanding customer needs and preferences to tailor their revenue strategies. This includes personalized pricing models, subscription-based services, and add-on offerings that enhance the customer experience and increase revenue streams. * Focus on Customer Retention: While acquiring new customers is essential, retaining existing customers will be equally crucial. RevOps will work on strategies to enhance customer loyalty, reduce churn, and increase customer lifetime value through personalized retention initiatives. * Agile and Adaptive Strategies: RevOps teams will adopt agile methodologies to quickly adapt to changing market conditions and customer demands. Flexibility and the ability to pivot strategies rapidly will be essential in the dynamic business landscape. Regarding the skills needed, my hope is most Revenue Operations leaders have these soft skills (they just get applied differently) around adaptability, problem-solving, process optimization, etc.). But I think we will see the need for stronger hard skills around data analytics/modeling and financial analysis - getting into the FP&A data and planning to properly model and plan (and adjust the plan) is going to be critical. I think FP&A and RevOps are going to become even closer partners in the future.
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674 Views
Mollie Bodensteiner
Mollie Bodensteiner
Sound Agriculture Revenue Operations LeaderDecember 14
Qualities and Skills of Strong RevOps Leaders: 1. Data-Driven Decision Making 1. Understanding: Proficiency in analyzing and interpreting data to make informed decisions. Great Revenue Operations leaders rely on data to identify trends, forecast revenues, and optimize strategies. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations heavily rely on data analytics to align sales, marketing, and customer success strategies. Expertise in data-driven decision-making is invaluable. 2. Cross-Functional Collaboration 1. Understanding: Experience in collaborating with various teams, including marketing, sales, finance, and customer success, to achieve common objectives. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations require seamless collaboration between departments. Leaders need to bridge gaps and facilitate effective communication among different functions. 3. Process Optimization 1. Understanding: Expertise in streamlining processes, identifying bottlenecks, and enhancing operational efficiency. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations leaders optimize end-to-end processes, ensuring smooth transitions from marketing-generated leads to sales and customer success interactions. 4. Technology Proficiency 1. Understanding: Familiarity with CRM systems, marketing automation tools, analytics platforms, and other technologies used in Revenue Operations. 2. Importance: Proficiency in technology enables Revenue Operations leaders to integrate systems, automate workflows, and leverage tools for data analysis and reporting. 5. Strategic Vision 1. Understanding: Ability to see the bigger picture, align operations with business goals, and develop long-term strategies for revenue growth. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations leaders formulate strategic plans, ensuring that operational activities are in line with the company's overarching revenue and growth objectives. 6. Customer-Centric Focus 1. Understanding: Understanding of customer journeys and the impact of operational decisions on customer satisfaction and loyalty. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations leaders design processes that enhance customer experience, contributing to customer retention and lifetime value. 7. Adaptability 1. Understanding: Willingness to adapt to new technologies, industry trends, and best practices in revenue generation. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations is dynamic, and leaders must stay updated with evolving technologies and market demands to drive continuous improvement. 8. Leadership and Communication Skills 1. Understanding: Strong leadership qualities, including effective communication, delegation, and conflict resolution skills. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations leaders lead cross-functional teams, making leadership and communication crucial for fostering collaboration and maintaining team morale. 9. Problem-Solving Abilities 1. Understanding: Ability to identify challenges, analyze root causes, and develop creative solutions to complex problems. 2. Importance: Revenue Operations leaders encounter diverse challenges that require innovative problem-solving to optimize processes and drive revenue growth. 10. Decision Making 1. Understanding: Commitment to ethical business practices and making decisions that align with the organization's values. 2. Importance: Ethical decision-making ensures that revenue strategies are sustainable and contribute positively to the organization's reputation and customer relationships.
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Credentials & Highlights
Revenue Operations Leader at Sound Agriculture
Top Revenue Operations Mentor List
Top 10 Revenue Operations Contributor
Knows About Finance / Revenue Ops Alignment, Business Operations, Customer Success Operations, Te...more