Shirin Sharif
Shirin Sharif
Adobe Sr. Director, Revenue OperationsNovember 16
My answer is actually not revenue ops specific. But here are my answers: 1) Growth- the rising tide lifts all ships. The higher the growth rate, the more opportunities you will have to scale the business and grow your career in parallel. 2) People / culture - make sure you like who you are working for / with and how work is being done 3) Role - what exactly will you be doing? Is this aligned with your skillset / strengths / interests? 4) Industry - tech vs. non tech / actually product function and buyer type. D2C vs. B2B. These all have trade offs and you have to decide what you want. I don't think you can be pick about all four categories but the first two are my most important ones and then I usually prioritize #3 over #4 but everyone has a different calculus on what's most important to them. 
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Michael Hargis
Michael Hargis
Tealium SVP, Revenue OperationsNovember 16
I love this question. The one tool that I can't live without right now is Clari. We run our entire business out of it at the executive level. Q4 is a critical one for any SaaS company at our scale and we rely on Clari to power our weekly forecast cadence, evaluate trends in the pipeline and click into the details of deal health for all of our opportunities, both new and expansion. I first got introduced to Clari in 2016 while at the TOPO conference in San Francisco and immediately saw the value. It wass 5 years later before I finally became a customer and now it's a tool that is always open on my MacBook and is typically the first thing I look at in the mornings.
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Daniel Lambert
Daniel Lambert
dbt Labs Director of Marketing OperationsMarch 16
I think the revenue operations career path is anything but typical. It's part of the reason why there's so little training and education around how to be a revenue operations leader, and why there is so much demand for good talent. The ways that I've seen people successfully enter and expand within the revenue operations space is: 1. Specialize at first: It's good to have an idea of where you want to focus your initial career development within RevOps. I would start with Sales Ops, Marketing Ops, or CS Ops and learn everything you can around that specific discipline. Try to start in that niche and grow your experience from there. 2. Lead to grow: For those of you who want to grow out of the specialized role and into a RevOps leader where you oversee multiple operations functional areas, I would try to get leadership experience in just your specialized area first (Marketing Operations Manager, Sales Operations Manager, etc). If you don't have sufficient leadership skills built up by the time you transition into managing multiple different functional areas, some that you will know better than others, you will likely struggle. 3. Take on new challenges: Everyone in RevOps knows that there are more asks than there will ever be time. To uplevel your career path, be selective in what you choose to take on. Every business will present opportunities that align with the core abilities that you can knock out of the park. Start with those, but grow into the things that are slightly outside of your comfort zone that will enable you to expand your experience and grow into a larger role.
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Brian Vass
Brian Vass
Paycor VP, Customer Experience OperationsNovember 17
I've hired many RevOps professionals with diverse backgrounds. But they all have several things in common: * They are smart. RevOps can get complicated and you need smart people who can keep up. * They are quick learners. It's rare to hire individuals with practical RevOps experience. As a result, you need to find people who can learn quickly and make an impact. * They are analytical. Goes without saying, but a big component of RevOps is data/analytics. Need analytical thinkers thatvnot only can provide data, but provide insights into what the data is telling us. * They are problem solvers. RevOps in a fast-growing company is full of new challenges. Need people who can think creatively to solve problems and help the business scale.
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Blake Cummins
Blake Cummins
Wolt Director, Head of Global Sales Strategy & OperationsJanuary 18
To be successful in revenue operations you must 1. have a data analysis foundation 2. be a strong problem solver and 3. be a good story teller. 1. Data foundation: the requirements will change depending on your company's tech stack (SQL, Tableau, SFDC, etc.), but you must have experience analyzing, visualizing and synthesize takeaways from data. Almost everything you do in rev ops must be data driven, and understanding how to pull actionable takeaways from large data sets is key. 2. Problem solving: Know different problem solving frameworks and apply them in your day to day to get experience with how they work. The most basic being 1. start with a hypothesis 2. test that hypothesis 3. debrief on results and iterate. It is also ok to test in an unscalable / manual / simple way. One of the biggest fallacies operators run into is trying to run the perfect test--use the 80/20 rule and be a scrappy problem solver 3. Story Telling: A large part of the rev ops role is aligning different teams (sales, marketing, product, finance, leadership, etc.) to work towards the same goal or on the same initiative--and story telling is a huge part of getting this cross-functional alignment. An operator needs to 1. get buy in (show the business impact and why the team should be excited to work on this) 2. clarify how the team is going to execute (demonstrate a well thought out plan with deadlines and DRIs) 3. assign ownership (identify who is responsible for each aspect of the plan).
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Melissa Sinclair
Melissa Sinclair
Shopify Senior Revenue Operations LeadNovember 2
My specific team is focussed on post-sales revenue operations. We are structured around a few aspects: 1. The Craft: Meaning merchant facing roles (ex. Customer Success, Sales, etc). My team is first split by that grain so they can really get to know the roles of those areas and develop strong stakeholder relationships to build the best process/systems/etc they can. 2. Segment: The second grain they are structured to is customer segment. The customer experience can differ greatly between segments depending on how many you have, size of those segments, and difference in the customer base avatar of those segments. (Ex. I have someone on my team that leads Customer Success Operations for Segment A while I have another person that leads Customer Success Operations for Segment B). This structure has really allowed the team to become highly impactful and to be able to ship impactful work quick while staying in tune with multiple teams for their areas.
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Sid Kumar
Sid Kumar
Databricks Area Vice President, GTM Strategy & PlanningFebruary 7
I'd consider a format that is easily accessible and that is easy to keep up to date. As such, I'd suggest something like a company wiki and/or link directly from your BI tool or whichever platform teams across your company access data and analytics. When creating this data dictionary, I'd spend the time upfront to get alignment from all the key stakeholders across the company that touch data that this will be the single source of truth and align on the process, timing and owners for updates to maintain the relevance of the content.
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Lindsay Rothlisberger
Lindsay Rothlisberger
Zapier Director, Revenue OperationsApril 4
Here are some goals I’d consider for a new RevOps function: First 30 days: 1. Meet with key stakeholders in sales, marketing, customer success, and finance to understand the current processes, tools, and technology being used. 2. Use the information gathered to identify areas where revenue operations can make the most impact, such as improving the sales process, implementing new technology, or optimizing the revenue model. 3. Develop a roadmap for revenue operations. Based on the gaps and opportunities identified, develop a plan for the next 3 months that outlines the initiatives, goals, and expected outcomes. 60 days: 1. Begin implementing the initiatives outlined in the roadmap, starting with the highest-priority items. Focus on the things that provide impact quickly, versus large long-term investments -- this will help gain momentum while you ramp and develop a deeper understanding of the business. 2. Develop processes and standard operating procedures. Such as standing meetings with sales and marketing leaders, revenue reporting cadences, project management norms, etc. 3. Review and optimize the tech stack. Review the company's technology stack and identify opportunities to optimize or replace tools that are not meeting the needs of the revenue operations function. 90 days: 1. Align the org around common language and definitions, such as lead and deal stage definitions and important conversion metrics. 2. Plan for future growth. Develop a plan for scaling revenue operations as the company grows, including hiring additional staff, implementing new tools, and refining processes. It’s really important to understand the needs of the business versus assuming that the systems, processes and tools should look similar to what you’ve seen in previous roles. So make sure to invest time up front learning from other folks in the org.
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James Darragh
James Darragh
dbt Labs Head of Revenue OperationsDecember 7
This is a great question - so many things about talent retention have to do with the company as a whole vs. things that I have control over on the operations team. So the first thing is to join a company that aligns with your values and where you believe in the mission and leadership; retention is much easier if it’s a great place to work! On the ops team in particular - make sure your team is working on projects that interest them, that they have a voice in setting their roadmap and OKRs and that you share context from other business units with your team to highlight the importance and impact of the work they’re doing. Also, if there are parts of the job that someone is particularly averse to (e.g. software procurement/negotiations) step in or offer support so they can do more impactful work. Unless it’s a key responsibility of their role, doing some lifting on those ‘less exciting’ tasks can go a long way. Finally, run defense for your team whenever possible so they have less thrash and can focus on their work and not on bureaucracy or fire drills.
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Tyler Will
Tyler Will
Intercom VP, Sales OperationsOctober 24
We use three tools for data and reporting: CRM (Salesforce), Clari, and Tableau. We also have Snowflake for the data warehouse but that's run by the Data Eng team in service of many teams beyond my Sales Ops team. Each of these serves a distinct purpose for us: 1. CRM(Salesforce): We do foundational reporting and dashboards here. The primary audience for these is the Sales team (reps and front line managers) to let them track their in-quarter performance, see KPIs, manage their team and opportunities, etc. We also manage our CRM hygiene tracking this way which is helpful because it lets each Manager stay on top of their team status. What I like about in-CRM reporting is that (1) it's real-time, (2) in a tool that everyone is using day after day (i.e., in the flow of work), and (3) it's straightforward to build and customize so everyone from Analyst to VP can do it. 2. Clari: We use Clari for forecasting which has significantly improved the quality and rigor of our forecasting process compared to the spreadsheet-based approach that preceded it. The Sales teams like Clari because it's easy to track and edit their opportunities and it highlights risks and opportunities clearly. I like it in my role because it brings together all the information I need to understand the global business, I can drill-down into individual opportunities, and use the predictive modeling to get an alternative view of the outlook for the quarter. It's also pretty intuitive for looking up past results which can be faster than a CRM-based report, depending on what I need to look at. 3. Tableau: More complicated data analysis is typically done using Tableau. I generally like this tool, both for the use case of summary dashboards (e.g., trends over time) and reporting that pulls together data sources beyond the CRM (e.g., product usage data). The downside is that it is more complex and requires investment to build. I have a team of three people focused on Sales Analytics that does most of the work here, but if you didn't have dedicated resources I can see Tableau being less useful.
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