All related (10)
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

This could really range based upon the company, your users, your target goals, where you are in your business lifecyle, etc.

The most basic ones are: acquisition, activation, retention, revenue, referral

You could also be measuring customer lifetime value

In regards to the worst KPIs, honestly those that cannot be discretely measured and tracked over a specific time period. Vanity metrics (e.g. the number of views from a marketing article or number of shares of a post) really add no value.

Paresh Vakhariya
Director of Product Management at Atlassian
Some of the worst KPI's in my opinion are: * KPI's that cannot be measured correctly * KPI's that do not give a sense for the goal you are tracking. You can use the AARRR (Acquisition, Activation, Retention, Revenue, Referral) framework to understand the best metrics you can choose to align with your outcome/goal. * KPI's that are not achievable in a desired timeframe. Yes there could be exceptions here but generally these are not the best ones in my opinion. * Any KPI's that do not really tell you the health of the business unless a holistic picture is presented. e.g. numb...more
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

Don't think of it of what you should and should not own. Think about what makes sense to the customers you are focusing on. Then think about where you are in the customer/product lifecycle and product/market fit. What does the overall business care about at this time (e.g. retention vs. acquisition) and start seeing how your product area could contribute back to that overall goal.

Tasha Alfano
Staff Product Manager, Libraries and SDKs at Twilio

The worst KPIs to commit to are the ones you can’t commit to at all. We can set targets and metrics and make dashboards, but that’s exactly what they are - targets. I recommend looking at past performance and trends within the data and setting a realistic yet aspirational target to work towards. After that, begin iterating on your target. Revisit the KPI, analyze, adjust, and communicate your findings.

Nico Rattazzi
VP of Product at Zumper

KPIs around delight unless this is your key product differentiator (which is proven to be compelling to customers). Focus on building an intuitive and effective product experience that users would want to recommend to their friends/colleagues. Focusing on the final pieces of polish such as interactions, delight, animations, etc are fluff until you're really providing value to your customers. This is why keeping your KPI or success metrics concise and essential will allow you to provide the most impact to customers.

Tasha Alfano
Staff Product Manager, Libraries and SDKs at Twilio
Developer Audience - now we are talking! As someone who worked as an engineer using SDKs, then building SDKs, and then moved into Product Management, I have a lot of opinions on this! We can definitely think about a ‘developer persona’ the way we all have different personas for our respective products, but all developers are definitely not the same. Building for different development platforms can add another layer of differentiation and complexity as well.  I have a secret though, when you work on developer tools, you already have an amazing pilot group - the engineering team building the...more
Farheen Noorie
Director of Product Management, Growth and Monetization at Zendesk
1. Rates: To me without absolute numbers, rates may paint a false picture. Let me explain with an example. Lets say you have a trial experience for your product and you are responsible for the cart experience and thereby conversion rates which is measured by number of paid customers/number of trialers. I would suggest that instead of rates the north star metrics should be a combination of number of paid customers as well as Average Deal Size (ADS) per paid customer. A conversion rate is a good number to track but may lead to wrong hypothesis when you see not nor...more
Nico Rattazzi
VP of Product at Zumper
I would start by understanding what is the company being graded on by its investors and how is this new product going to deliver/contribute to that KPI. Let's say your investors are keen on seeing revenue growth this year. You can begin by benchmarking the lifetime revenue growth of the various product offerings of your company and then estimate (based on your user research/data) what will be the adoption rate for this new product area/market. You can then begin to model out some first year numbers. Of course, this will seem super arbitrary but truth be told once you launch, your prediction...more
Farheen Noorie
Director of Product Management, Growth and Monetization at Zendesk
Product Management is a bit hard to list skills for because product managers wear so many different hats and each company has a different way on how they think of product management. But I do think there are some broad skills that PMs should have or build as they think of their career.  1. Hustle - This is the number 1 skill that I look for. If you have this everything else follows or can be built. 2. Empathy - Understanding your customer and being able to put yourselves in their shoes 3. Storytelling - Communication is key for product managers but I think its super importan...more
Paresh Vakhariya
Director of Product Management at Atlassian
Here is a rough process I would follow but it really varies a lot depending upon each business: * Understand Company Objectives and Goals * Have a clear Product Vision and Strategy that aligns with these goals/objectives * Create higher level OKR's that can map to KPI's * Determine the top KPI's the company is interested in driving/moving. Examples are: Business Performance KPIs: Customer counts, Customer / user acquisition, Retention Rate, Churn Rate, Revenue etc. * Make a prioritized list of these KPI's you can measure. Example Revenue would map to MRR and so on * Pick ...more