All related (50)
Harish Peri
Head of Product Marketing - Security, Integrations, Mobile, SalesforceApril 4
1. How does your company think of its 'market'? This is essentially a segmentation exercise but sometimes the hardest part. This requires alignment between sales, product, and marketing and is a great starting point for PMM to make an impact. Decide on the GTM 'vector' early - ie. verticals, company size, revenue band, geo, use case, needs based. Decide on the definitions of each and write them down 2. For a given release or launch, what are the priority segments?. Not everything is going to be equally important to every segment and the core of GTM is to make t...
Jeffrey Vocell
Head of Product Marketing, Narvar | Formerly Iterable, HubSpot, IBMSeptember 1
I think every product marketing team should! Ultimately, at Iterable we have 3 key documents: * Product GTM Launch Plan - This is a spreadsheet that includes every team involved in a launch, what set of activities are being done, where they are in the development process, and more. It's really a central resource for the entire launch. * Positioning & Campaign Kick-Off - This document should be filled out first before everything else. It includes all of the foundational details that will help create positioning, and what should go into your launch campaign (in the sp...
Quinn Hubbard
Head of Global Product Marketing, Driver, Shopper & Courier Experience, UberMay 4
A thorough go to market (GTM) plan can provide incredible clarity for the many, many stakeholders who are involved in a launch. That’s why it’s so important for the GTM plan to be self-serve when you don’t have the luxury of walking your colleagues through it. The goal is to align your core team, plus answer the top questions for anyone else who needs to be looped in. I suggest using these 9 sections as your core elements: 1. Business context, goals and projected impact → why is this launching? 2. Product experience → what is launching? 3. Audience insights, definition and targeting str...
Dave Steer
Vice President of Product Marketing, GitLabJuly 28
I love this question because it widens the aperture from product launch to go-to-market plan. The product launch is an important part of the go-to-market plan, but the launch only represents one (really important) point in time. I like to think of the product launch as the rocket booster that you need to get your message to the marketplace. Before I share my blueprint, I have an important PSA for product marketers: product availability is not the same thing as product launch. Product availability is when the product is functional (as defined by the product requirements doc) and can be used...
Susan "Spark" Park
Head of Product Marketing, VR Work Experiences, Oculus, MetaJanuary 31
I invented the 5A Framework for GTM to easily communicate a nd keep track the top objectives of a Go-To-Market plan.  1. Audience: You must understand your target(s), and how it will be best to approach them.  2. Angle: What is your message/angle. This will tell your audience(s) how you solve a problem. 3. Accomplishments: Your goals and milestones 4. Activate: How will you execute your plan?  5. Assess: Evaluate and adjust If your GTM has all of these five elements you have a solid overview of what your GTM will deliver. It also creates real-language objectives for your GTM ...
Jodi Innerfield
Senior Director, Product Marketing, Salesforce
Tiering and t-shirt sizing a launch should be based on "how impactful is this to my customer and the company?" If it's a brand new product suite, a new offering in the market either for the company or the space, or a material investment/improvement from what exists today--that's a Tier 1, full-court press (whatever that means for your company!)  Moderate improvements, new SKUs, bigger features that are exciting but not totally new and different for the company are the market are more medium-Tier launches. Smaller features and incremental updates can be covered in release marketing only, m...