All related (8)
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

Don't think of it of what you should and should not own. Think about what makes sense to the customers you are focusing on. Then think about where you are in the customer/product lifecycle and product/market fit. What does the overall business care about at this time (e.g. retention vs. acquisition) and start seeing how your product area could contribute back to that overall goal.

Paresh Vakhariya
Director of Product Management at Atlassian
* Congratulations to you! There are a lot of ways you can pave the path for KPI's at your company as the first hire * The KPI's should be directly based on the business outcome you plan to achieve. * Even before that though, I would highly recommend having a solid Product Vision and Strategy in place for your company/product * Who are your customers? What is the benefit you are trying to provide them? * After that you can use the AARRR (Acquisition, Activation, Retention, Revenue, Referral) framework to understand the best metrics you can choose to align with this outcom...more
Virgilia Kaur Pruthi (she/her)
Principal PM & Product Coach at Microsoft | Formerly Amazon

Such a great question! When you first set a KPI especially if you are in a new market and/or in a new product/customer space, it can feel uneasy. The best way I have learned is by setting something and tracking it over time, seeing if there is any measurable change. If not start by marking out the customer's journey (no matter who they are) and see if you can collect data on their interactions along the way. This may reveal some hidden trends you weren't yet measuring.

Tasha Alfano
Staff Product Manager, Libraries and SDKs at Twilio
Congratulations! I’ll answer your question with a few questions of my own. 1. Purpose: What do you want to drive? What does your organization expect you to own? In Product Management there is a lot of autonomy, but it can also feel tempting to take on everything that needs an owner. 2. Outcomes: If you don’t own a specific KPI, what will happen? In a year, will this KPI matter? What about in 3 years? Does the KPI support the goals of the business in a real way? I’d recommend starting with 2-3 target KPIs that tie directly to your purpose. From there, make the targets vis...more
Tasha Alfano
Staff Product Manager, Libraries and SDKs at Twilio
In the past I've worked on new library launches, major upgrades, and I'm actually in the process of an end of life (EOL) effort right now. While these types of efforts have their own nuances, the core principles remain the same.  1. Transparency - When working on developer tools you have to maintain the highest level of transparency possible. Systems, developer workflows, and customer data can all be dependent on these tools and their interfaces. 2. Communication - The way and the cadence that you distribute information about changes to libraries or tools goes hand in hand wi...more
Nico Rattazzi
VP of Product at Zumper
It's worth ensuring you collaborate closely with your PMM to ensure you know who is responsible for what along all touchpoints. In general, top of the funnel channels owned by marketing should be owned by their team (social, paid, blog, email, etc). Everything else should be owned by the product/design/engineering team (with the exception when marketing owns the development of those product ie. lead gen with "no code" tools). The touchpoints where marketing hands customers over to the product experience should have the right metrics tracked to understand A) the quantity and quality of users...more
Farheen Noorie
Director of Product Management, Growth and Monetization at Zendesk
Product Management is a bit hard to list skills for because product managers wear so many different hats and each company has a different way on how they think of product management. But I do think there are some broad skills that PMs should have or build as they think of their career.  1. Hustle - This is the number 1 skill that I look for. If you have this everything else follows or can be built. 2. Empathy - Understanding your customer and being able to put yourselves in their shoes 3. Storytelling - Communication is key for product managers but I think its super importan...more
Paresh Vakhariya
Director of Product Management at Atlassian
Here is a rough process I would follow but it really varies a lot depending upon each business: * Understand Company Objectives and Goals * Have a clear Product Vision and Strategy that aligns with these goals/objectives * Create higher level OKR's that can map to KPI's * Determine the top KPI's the company is interested in driving/moving. Examples are: Business Performance KPIs: Customer counts, Customer / user acquisition, Retention Rate, Churn Rate, Revenue etc. * Make a prioritized list of these KPI's you can measure. Example Revenue would map to MRR and so on * Pick ...more