Nisha Goklaney
Nisha Goklaney
HubSpot Senior Director of Product MarketingNovember 9
I have used several different messaging frameworks, but one that we are leveraging quite a lot these days is the Jobs to be done framework, accompanied by durable, evergreen messages that are centered around our key customer personas and their pain points. In this framework you start by: 1. First, Understanding your ‘who’ (aka your key buyer personas) - who they are, what are their goals, their challenges, what keeps them up at night and what pain points they are most struggling with. We get super detailed here, with understanding how our buyers make software purchase decisions, where they go for information, what their key influence points are (e.g. website, review sites, analyst relations, buyer enablement content etc.) 2. Second, Develop your ‘why’ - Our next step is then to articulate how we help our key personas solve for their jobs to be done and what makes us unique in doing so. These take the shape of ‘durable messages’ or ‘messaging pillars’ that explain the distinct value of your product or service and why a customer should consider your solution to address their JTBD. Top tip to get to this is by listening to prospect calls (Use Gong if your company records them, you’ll start to see patterns emerge) 3. Third, Develop your ‘how’ - This is where you go into details to explain with 2-3 simple examples of how a customer can use your product/service to help them solve their jobs to be done. Top tip here: If you focus on a specific industry, vertical - use the opportunity to explain how you have brought value to customers here. Always include output data points (e.g. time saved, efficiency gained, ROI, Revenue) where possible to measure impact 4. Put it all together - Using the insights and info you have collected, put together 1. Elevator pitch - 1-2 sentences that explains the job your product/service does, who it is for, and how it is differentiated 2. Messaging pillars - 3 pillars that explain the value you bring to your target customer 3. Used cases - real life examples of how you deliver value with outcomes 4. Reason to Believe/Proof - Include customer testimonials, reviews & ratings, analyst relations
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Apurva Davé
Apurva Davé
Aembit CMOMay 25
I'll focus on the creating great messaging, because frankly that's the most challenging part of the job. Especially given the noise out there with so many products, and so many companies being funded, it's really hard to stand out. I think there are lots of ways to create great messaging, but it all comes from the same place: * Great insight into your customers drive great messaging. That's it. So then the question is, how do you get there? For me it means holistically understanding the environment around your user, and then being able to connect the most differentiated value of your product to their world. That means your product marketers must have a deep understanding of the customer as well as the demands and challenges they face, combined with a deep understanding of your own product, and finally the overall environment (competitors, legacy products, substitutions). When this comes together, messaging must be defensible (it's true) and must be differentiated (you couldn't slap a competitor's name on it and have the market believe it). Finally and most importantly, it must matter. The customer must care about your why's and how's. Over time as a marketing leader you develop a sense if a product message meets these requirements, but the only real proof is testing it with your customer base and proxies for the base. Proxies include product managers, good sales people, and analysts. Use them! And then when you're ready test with willing customers, and then finally with prospects who don't know they are getting the new stuff. Don't be afraid to get the message out there. Finally, I would say that I'm not a huge fan of A/B testing messaging through ads or web pages in the early days. While you may see which one gets more clicks, you won't know why. Having real conversations allows you to ask the follow on questions that give you the insight needed to improve your messaging.
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Rekha Srivatsan
Rekha Srivatsan
Salesforce Vice President Product MarketingJuly 27
Welcome to the PMM world! ;) My approach to this would be: * Take a closer look at the particular job responsibilities. If the job responsibilities are heavy on content creation, I'd include samples of the content you've created in your marketing portfolio. * In addition, include a variety of different content pieces too. This will help the hiring team know your diverse skills as well as give them ideas on what they can do -- making you a standout winner. * You can also look at the company's website to understand their current content mix, voice, etc. And see if you can include things you've created to fit that approach. * Extra credit would be to always add things you've worked on or created to your LinkedIn profile. I usually add my interviews, webpages, videos, customer stories, blogs that I've created to my profile with some context. In summary, go for a mix of different channels/ideas you've done to give them a taste of what they can expect from you. Good luck!
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Mary Sheehan
Mary Sheehan
Adobe Head of Lightroom Product MarketingJanuary 16
Ultimately I think that every launch should have one "north-star" goal and cascading KPIs, and you might see that varies by launch. For example, your north-star could be increasing Annual Recurring Revenue (ARR), increasing customer Monthly Active Use (MAU), or increasing net new customers. Once you've landed on that, you should be ruthless about developing a GTM strategy that helps you hit those goals, and choosing metrics that help you understand if you are on track for those goals or not. That being said, the KPIs that I've found most common to track are: * Total web or app traffic and conversion rate * Email sends / opens / conversion rates * Product usage & MAU * Attributed ARR * Digital marketing metrics like impressions and conversion rates * Contribution of the launch to Marketing Qualified Leads MQLs (for B2B)
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Esther Yoon
Esther Yoon
RingCentral Vice President, Industry and Product MarketingOctober 18
I'm going to break this out into two questions: How do you tier launches? Launches are tiered based on business impact (yes, I know, very "captain obvious.") My whole point here is that I make a judgment call based on data, company goals, competitive landscape, market opportunity. For example, is this a feature/product/capability that is going to move the needle for your brand, competitive positioning, sales revenue, PR coverage, analysts? I like to tier based on business impact, but another way to tier (if you haven't converged them) is to tier based on GTM resources that are going to be needed to support the launch. I suggest not using an hard and fast rule for tiering. What's more important is aligning with your GTM stakeholders, your PM counterparts, and your business units. If you're unsure, send out a quick survey with a line asking why someone tiered it that way. What KPIs do you assign each tier? I'm going to answer this, without answering this. KPIs should be thoughtful and bespoke. Product marketing KPIs are typically qualitatitive so a good measure of success is always your GTM team's success. PR pickup, analyst response, pitch deck downloads, blog traffic, time on site, CTR, pipeline generated... In areas for launch motions aren't mature (c'mon, we've all been there), I always ask team members for areas of improvement and track against them. Ah-ha moment: If your GTM teams are successful, PMM is successful. Ask your GTM teams how to help them be successful and include those as PMM KPIs.
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Sherry Wu
Sherry Wu
Gong Senior Director, Product MarketingJuly 19
In my experience, this is one of the toughest things as a PMM. You always see the potential upside for making an announcement, and you can spin a story out of anything / convince anybody why something matters. But really, you need to exercise a lot of restraint to avoid overloading your sales teams (in B2B companies) and customers with the sheer volume of releases. I like to group features into regular channels (e..g monthly newsletters and webinars) so customers can appreciate the feature velocity but only have to think about digesting information once a month. For small features, it's not just about the splashiness of the feature, but the impact to customers. Here are a few examples: * Planned downtime -- this is not splashy, but users should know and be informed to plan around it. Think about the channels that you have to reach your target audience. Users may be active in the product, or it may be more effective to deliver notices via email. A multi-channel approach works well here. * Small polish features / improvements to their experience -- let's say you have a small improvement that isn't going to break workflows, but is just going to improve quality of life. Oftentimes customers will discover this improvement on their own. But, it can be helpful to highlight these features in some sort of monthly newsletter, to demonstrate how your team is continually delivering features to delight users.
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Malli Vangala
Malli Vangala
Circana Chief Strategy OfficerOctober 7
Sure. While I cannot share internal documents necessarily, I can share a few elements that I think make up good messaging frameworks. 1. Market and competitive context 2. Product strategy/objective (i.e. why we are introducing this particular product/capability and how it fits in broader portfolio of products 3. Clear articulation of target customer segment and their pain points we are trying to address 4. Value prop (ideally backed up by research validation!) and finally 5. Messaging (1-sentence articulation, 2-3 mins 'elevator pitch' you'd want sales team to make) 
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Christina Dam
Christina Dam
Lightspeed Commerce Vice President, Brand & Product MarketingOctober 13
Great question and I would be very curious to hear how other companies do this! I mentioned in an earlier question that Square is very collaborative, and that means there is a mix of formal, and informal, ways in which we deliver customer feedback. Formal research / customer feedback studies: * PMM often captures customer feedback through conducting surveys, commissioning external research, listening to calls from Sales or Account Management/Customer Success, analyzing dashboards, or conducting interviews ourselves. * When we conduct these more formal studies, we always produce a Google Doc that summarizes the project objectives, goals and approach, and key findings (in addition to a link to all the raw data & feedback). * PMMs can provide immense value by taking the time to distill the insights into an executive summary, and articulate the prevalence of a specific piece/theme of feedback, and the impact it could have if addressed (e.g. will more customers adopt the product, vs. will it help with engagement or retention, etc). * In order to highlight this added strategic perspective, I haven’t found anything more effective than a well-written doc that the product teams can read and comment on. More informal ways of delivering feedback: * We host regular meetings with our Sales, Account Management and Customer Success representatives where they can surface individual customer stories and feedback directly to both PMs and PMMs. * We also utilize slack channels heavily, where PMMs and other functions can share customer feedback directly with our product managers, as we hear it. While many of these ‘one-off’ stories re-inforce feedback that has already been heard before, they provide additional insight into use cases or nuances that may not have been fully understood before. Top Tools used for delivering customer feedback: 1. Google Docs & Sheets - to summarize customer feedback, which can be translated into spreadsheets that Product Managers can use to further assess and prioritize the requests. 2. Salesforce is used by our Sales/AM teams to log feature requests, with dashboards we can access to pull top requests. 3. Gong - We also utilize Gong to listen to calls from our Sales/AM teams, and will often include links to the recordings in write-ups. And finally, I’ll mention the importance of repetition in delivering customer feedback. A well-written report may be appreciated and digested, but a PMM will gain even more trust as the voice of the customer if they are also referencing those key insights and speaking knowingly about the customer use cases in live discussions, product design reviews, roadmap planning sessions and more.
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John Hurley
John Hurley
Notion Head of Product MarketingDecember 15
When it comes to defining goals for product launches, we tend to consider both short-term and long-term objectives. In the short-term, our goals may be centered around acquisition, engagement, and awareness. For example, we might aim to gain a certain number of new users, or to generate a certain amount of buzz on social media in the weeks following the launch. These early indicators can help us understand whether our product is resonating with our target audience, and can give us some early feedback on potential areas for improvement. Long-term goals, on the other hand, are focused on driving sustained usage and adoption. We want users to not only try our product, but to continue using it over time. This may involve goals around user retention or activation rates, as well as measuring how frequently users are engaging with our product. Ultimately, our goals for product launches are tailored to each specific product and our broader company objectives, but it is important that we consider both short-term and long-term goals in order to create a successful launch.
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Priya Kotak
Priya Kotak
Figma Product MarketingFebruary 23
I’m a big advocate of getting messaging in front of customers and potential customers directly. Here are a few ways I’ve done that recently: * Test messaging in product betas: At Figma we often launch features to a subset of customers in beta before making them generally available. I like to use this as an opportunity to test some messaging ideas. Not only can you test messaging in recruitment comms and onboarding decks you can join feedback calls to hear use cases and benefits in the customers’ own words * Test landing pages with target audience: When we launched FigJam we created 3 versions of our landing page, each leaning into slightly different messaging, and partnered with our research team to test them with customers in our target audience. We had them react to each page as well as answer various questions to gauge which messaging was easiest to understand and most compelling. I feel comfortable knowing messaging won’t be 100% perfect at launch and that it will evolve as we learn how users actually use the feature/product. If you’re already sending surveys and talking to customers you’re on the right track — from there you can iterate post launch. Here are some things you can do to learn whether you need to tweak your messaging: * Review performance: Look at metrics for your landing page, blog post, etc. How are they performing compared to benchmarks? Are you seeing the traffic and conversions you expected? If not, this might be a sign that the product messaging isn’t resonating — a good next step would be talking to some customers and your Sales team. * Learn from Sales: Check-in with your Sales team to learn from their experience. How has the messaging and pitch for the new product been landing? Are they using the materials you created or have they changed them? Joining or listening to calls is a great way to understand this first hand. You can also look through data in your CRM to learn who’s buying so you know whether your messaging is targeting the right personas
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