All related (11)
Eric Chang
Director, Product Marketing at 1Password
I am a huge fan of the STAR format (and also keeping answers to two minutes or less)! For any interview, I think it's important to identify and prepare your key 3-4 examples, which you can then use to display a wide range of skills depending on the question type. When you're responding to a question using one of these examples, make sure to take the opportunity to quickly highlight some of those soft skills. Example: If you're asked about a time where you had to analyze data, of course you should convey how you analyzed the data, but you likely had to work with someone from analytics to id...more
Valerie Angelkos
Product Marketing Lead at Plaid | Formerly Google
I'd weave these topics in as you answer the hard skill questions. Depending on your examples, theu could be easier to be included. Things to touch upon: 1. Leadership + Influencing without authority  2. Collaboration with XFN teams 3. Dealing with ambiguity (in particular in startup/smaller companies) 4. Managing conflict  5. Inclusiveness (this is something I look for frequently but hardly ever touched upon by candidates) 6. Communicating across stakeholders However, please note that a good interview process should cover both hard and soft skills. If no one in your interview pan...more
Marcus Andrews
Director of Product Marketing at Pendo.io
Here are the biggest 2 - communication and teamwork.  PMMs are one of the most cross functional roles in marketing / most companies. You have to be able to bring teams together and create momentum where none exists. This is hard to do if you're not a good collaborater / teammate. Skills like empathy, low ego, enthusiasm, transparency, and more come in real handy here.  The other big one is communication. Maybe it's controversial but PMM is a communications job. A huge part of our value is taking product updates and packaging and positioing them so they are easier to understand and sell or...more
Robert McGrath
Vice President Global Marketing at CalypsoAI

Bring your behaviours into your answers. The relationships you've built, the challenging people you've persuaded etc. It's important to be clear on the activity and the task, but ensure, within the STAR framework, you're not only answering the "what" you did but the "how" you did it. 

As an interviewer the "how" means more to me, as it's a signal not only to your ability to succeed in the role but your ability to be the best you can be within the culture of the organisation. 

Abdul Rastagar
GTM Leader | Marketing Author | Career Coach
While interviewers focus on your response to the hard skills question, they are simultaneously evaluating your soft skills as well. Generally, they are evaluating your EQ and your communication skills, your ability to interpret questions and think critically in real time, and your ability to provide direct and concrete answers. Here is an example that I hope really illustrates my point: if an interviewer asks “Tell me about yourself,” they are looking for a concise career narrative but also watching how the candidate will respond more generally. Is the answer succinct and can the candidate...more
Abdul Rastagar
GTM Leader | Marketing Author | Career Coach

I suppose that answer varies for everyone. For me, it was simply about being more comfortable with marketing than with product management. I didn’t really know what product marketing was until a few years into my marketing career but once I got into it, I loved it. In hindsight, I don't regret it for a second. Having said that, there is obviously an overlap and each position must intimately understand the other. 

Valerie Angelkos
Product Marketing Lead at Plaid | Formerly Google

I think it depends ultimately on what the team needs. In a highly technical area, I'd value industry and product knowledge highly, as long as the person is then coachable and open to learn on other areas within the PMM world. In a not so technical area, I'd prioritize PMM skillsets over other areas. Soft skills should be part of the package either way, aligned with the value of your team and company.

Ultimately the goal is to find the right balance and bring different perspectives so the team can learn from each other as well.

Robert McGrath
Vice President Global Marketing at CalypsoAI

Having a culture of openness and transparency across the team. Strong support in the development and alignment with each individual PMMs career & skill development roadmap. Finally, you offer interesting and stretching projectsthat spike passions and, as a manager, give your team the guardrails to operate and then, get out of their way!

Liz Tassey (she/her)
VP of Marketing at Blueocean.ai
I think it's a balance, but if I had to choose, leaning in to those soft skills is a great strategy when you are starting out.   It's really important to go into a new team / company with a really strong growth mindset and a relationship building / collaboration ethos. Be curious, meet with your key stakeholders to really understand how PMM can be a good partner, learn about the business and what's working / what's not (this will lean in on data/business acumen for sure), learn the customer and the product, and start to build a view of where the business could best use your help. (To be ...more
Ryane Bohm
Director, Product Marketing at Gong | Formerly Salesforce, GE

I tend to keep my communications short, sweet, and to the point while keeping the mentality of "what's in it for them" at the top of my mind. Bullet points and a TL;DR summary help with this. Make sure there is a crisp ask or offering at the end if you are hoping for a next step And as you would with anybody you work with, be respectful of their time!