Product Strategy

9 Answers
Sandeep Rajan
Sandeep Rajan
Patreon Product Lead, Member ExperienceFebruary 23
I think of this in two ways best conveyed through a sports metaphor: learning new plays I can add to my playbook, and building reps so that I can figure out what the right play is for a given scenario.  For the first, I enjoy reading about strategy – lots of Stratechery, various strategy books, ...Read More
972 Views
6 Answers
Wade G. Morgan
Wade G. Morgan
Airtable Product Strategy & OperationsFebruary 16
Our mission as a team is to clarify & accelerate the product roadmap. For us, clarification means a couple things: 1. Do we know what we aspire to invest in over the next quarter, half year, or FY? 2. Have we clarified our decision / prioritization framework of what causes an initiativ...Read More
2566 Views
12 Answers
Brandon Green
Brandon Green
Buffer Staff Product ManagerAugust 16
Everywhere! Users themselves, colleagues, market research, competitors, randomly in the shower. Generally, I like to consider each idea seriously and work through a few questions to help decide if they are worth building: 1. What, fundamentally is the problem this idea is meant to solve? How wo...Read More
2688 Views
3 Answers
Mike Arcuri
Mike Arcuri
Meta Director of Product - Horizon Worlds PlatformNovember 21
This really depends on the maturity stage for your product. For 0-1 work in startups (new products, not-yet-released), I recommend the models explained by Steve Blank (e.g. customer development process, business model canvas). There are so many unknowns and intertwined hypotheses for brand new p...Read More
1066 Views
9 Answers
Wade G. Morgan
Wade G. Morgan
Airtable Product Strategy & OperationsFebruary 16
This is a natural question and I would specify the question a bit to say "how do we validate that our product strategy is the right one for us?"  Might seem like a small delineation, but the truth is, no one strategy is right for every company or product. What works amazingly for one company cou...Read More
2108 Views
5 Answers
Melissa Ushakov
Melissa Ushakov
GitLab Group Manager, Product ManagementAugust 31
Understanding your users is critical to building a product that will effectively solve their problems, and they will be excited to use. The JTBD framework is effective because it encourages product managers to focus on problems, not solutions. You can read more about how we use this framework at ...Read More
828 Views
6 Answers
Sandeep Rajan
Sandeep Rajan
Patreon Product Lead, Member ExperienceFebruary 22
I generally don't believe in investing in differentiation for differentiation's sake – if the feature doesn't solve a core customer need then I'd have a hard time prioritizing it over a feature that does simply for the purpose of checking a box on a table unless there's a strong belief (preferabl...Read More
827 Views
5 Answers
Wade G. Morgan
Wade G. Morgan
Airtable Product Strategy & OperationsFebruary 17
Love this question as well, and I'll approach it from a couple different perspectives. First, I'd acknowledge that some markets are so big or fast growing that multiple amazingly successful winners can emerge. As of today, Apple is worth $2.8T and Microsoft is worth $2.25T. While I'm sure both co...Read More
2268 Views
7 Answers
Sandeep Rajan
Sandeep Rajan
Patreon Product Lead, Member ExperienceFebruary 22
The more differentiated & sticky your core value proposition is, the less you'll need to worry about market trends, as you'll have more and more of a market all to yourself. Make this your goal. Few companies find themselves in that position. For the rest, market trends give us a better sense of...Read More
943 Views
1 Answer
Shahid Hussain
Shahid Hussain
Google Group Product Manager, Wear OSMay 21
If you know that customers are not willing to adopt your solution, that's a bad spot to be in. 1. Re-evaluate what led you to the decision to build & when to do it. Was there a gap in your methodology, or a piece of research that led you down this path? How can you avoid this for the ne...Read More
692 Views